• English

Theme: Copyright, to be or not to be

What is the justification for copyright and related rights protection, and what can we do to live up to that?

Preliminary Programme

[Certain names indicated in this draft program are tentative and not all the persons concerned have been consulted as regards their ability and willingness to participate.]


Thursday, May 18, 2017

09.00         

Opening session

Welcome speeches:

The President of the Danish Copyright Association

The President of ALAI

The representative of WIPO

A high level representative of the Danish Government

10.00

Coffee break   

10.30

The traditional justifications for copyright and related rights

Frequently, the justification for copyright is discussed on the basis of the original reasons why copyright was introduced in the statutes, starting in the late 18th century, and the different reasons have been used as an explanation why copyright developed differently in common law and civil law countries. These reasons must be seen in their contemporary context before their present validity can be assessed. The much more recent protection of related rights may follow partly the same, but also partly different rationales. The reasons advanced for national protection may differ from those advanced for international protection.

Moderator:         

Professor Victor Nabhan, Ferney-Voltaire

Speakers:

Professor Jane Ginsburg, Columbia Law School, New York

Ms. Gillian Davies, Barrister, Hogarth Chamber, London

Plenary discussion

12.30

Lunch break

14.00

Economic aspects of copyright and related rights

Based on a common methodology, there is now much quantitative research regarding the economic aspects of copyright and related rights in different countries. What significance does that have for maintaining and further developing the system of copyright and related rights? More recently, attempts are being made to establish a methodology for a qualitative assessment of copyright and related rights. What are the results so far, and is it pointing the same way as the quantitative research? If copyright and related rights are beneficial, who is benefitting? There are many interests at stake, authors, performers, producers, publishers, disseminators, users, ISPs, Telcos, users, the general public. How are their economic interests balanced against each other? How can such quantitative and qualitative information be used to guide policy-making on copyright and related rights?

Moderator:

Dr. Mihály Ficsor, Budapest

Rapporteur:

Mr. Jukka Liedes, Helsinki

Co-rapporteur:      

Professor Alain Strowel, Université Saint-Louis and Université catholique de Louvain

Panelists:

 

Professor Paul Goldstein, Stanford University, Palo Alto

Professor Jan Rosen, University of Stockholm

Mr. Alexander Kunz, WIPO, Geneva

Mr. Ted Shapiro, Wiggin LLP, London

Dr. Stef van Gompel, Institute for Information Law, Amsterdam

Professor Ruth Towse, Bournemouth University

Plenary discussion

15.30

Coffee break

16.00

Economic aspects of copyright and related rights, cont’d

17.30

End of the day’s conference program


Friday, May 19, 2017

09.00

Individual and collective licensing as a means of improving the functioning and acceptance of copyright and related rights

Certain copyrights and related rights are increasingly managed collectively, while others are predominantly managed individually. New licensing models are developing, such as extended collective licensing; license globale; compulsory collective management. At the same time, other forms of payment than direct from consumer/user to rights holder are being developed or used in new contexts, such as advertising; linking with other purchases; tracking the consumers’ behavior on the net; subscription to streaming services. Will such new models improve the functioning and general acceptance of copyright and related rights? Is the smooth functioning of the system impeded by obstacles such as heirs, trolls, orphans and non-responsive rights owners?

Moderator:

Mr. Peter Schønning, Copenhagen

Rapporteur:

Professor Daniel J. Gervais, Vanderbilt Law School, Nashville

Co-rapporteur:

Professor Severine Dusollier, University of Namur

Panelists:

Mr. Ang Kwee Tiang, IFPI, Singapore

Uma Suthersanen, Queen Mary University of London

Ms. Patricia Mariscal, Elsaburu, Spain

Plenary discussion

10.30

Coffee break

11.00

Individual and collective licensing as a means of improving the functioning and acceptance of copyright and related rights, cont’d

12.30

Lunch break

14.00

General tendencies and future developments

Concluding panel/plenary discussion: should copyright ‘be’ or not, and what do we need to do? Ways of improving the general acceptance of and respect for copyright; enforcement on the Internet; education and promotion of the general understanding of and respect for copyright.

Co-Moderator:

Professor Morten Rosenmeier, University of Copenhagen

 

Co-Moderator:

Professor Frank Gotzen, President of the ALAI

Rapporteur:

Ms. Jacqueline Seignette, Partner, Höcker Advocaten, Amsterdam

Co-rapporteur:

Professor Pierre Sirinelli, Université Paris I, Panthéon Sorbonne

Co-rapporteur:

Mrs. Stefania Ercolani, Director, Multimedia Department, SIAE, Rome

Co-rapporteur:

Professor Igor Gliha, University of Zagreb

 

Co-rapporteur:

Ms. Maria Fredenslund, Rettighedsalliancen, Copenhagen

16.30

Closing session

16.45

ALAI General Assembly